– EQ Trends

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EQ Trends

3 RESEARCH-BACKED REASONS YOUR LEADERS NEED EQ TRAINING

A recent review took a close look at the emotional intelligence of leaders. Their goal was to understand if the EQ of a leader impacts their direct reports, and if so, how. In looking at the leader-follower relationships of more than 6300 leaders, three key points came to light:

  1. Employees reporting to high EQ leaders are more likely to perform higher and have greater job satisfaction.
  2. Employees reporting to high EQ leaders engage in more organizational citizenship behaviors (such as showing altruism, courtesy, sportsmanship, conscientiousness, and civic virtue.).
  3. Employees rate their leaders’ EQ as highly valuable across cultures and around the world.

EQ FOR GOOD, OR FOR EVIL? THE RESEARCH SAYS “GOOD” ALL THE WAY…

Critics of EQ like to make the claim that people high in emotional intelligence can use their social skills in manipulative or inauthentic ways. But, what does the research say? Do emotionally intelligent people manipulate the way critics say they will?

No. In fact, they do the exact opposite. In a review looking at EQ and organizational citizenship behavior with over 16,000 people, researchers found that:

 

  • Higher EQ is related to greater organizational citizenship behavior.
  • Lower EQ is related to counterproductive work behavior.

EQ IS HIGHLY TRAINABLE: A DEEP LOOK AT THE TRAINABILITY OF EQ

There are a lot of trainings out there but only a select few are supported by the same breadth and depth of research that supports EQ training. A comprehensive review of 16 years’ worth of EQ training studies (76 studies), shows that emotional intelligence is a highly trainable skill set. The researchers, Victoria Mattingly and Kurt Kraiger, looked at studies across a wide range of people, jobs, industries, and backgrounds. Across all these studies, they found that people trained in EQ improved significantly compared to those who didn’t train.

The authors noticed one other critical element. Those studies that used a more active and experiential approach to training—they skipped out on boring lecture-style trainings in favor of active approaches such as practice, feedback, and coaching—showed even greater improvements.